Demand for HTML5 software


#1

Ever since I found out about Haxe/Openfl I was mainly focused on using it for making mobile apps and games. Maybe that is a wrong impression but seems to me that most people here on this forum are more interested in HTML5 than mobile/desktop platforms. I myself don’t see any good use of HTML5 besides a plethora of gaming sites with thousands of small games which provide very little revenue. Can you please share how do you use HTML5 for your business or hobby? Can you make revenue with it? P.S. I know TrueValhalla but I believe it’s bs. Thanks in advance.


#2

You can target html5 and then do mobile with frameworks like phone gap or desktop with electron. Openfl is also not just used for games alot of devolpers build ui applications with it. Html5 for generating revenue depends on your business plan but it is defiently possible to generate revenue and I think openfl is an amazing tool to do so.


#3

OpenFL doesnt even have UDP sockets, so its pretty limited for desktop games unfortunately.


#4

@niceneasy

IT depends, like pxshadow said, on the client. In the past, I have done contract work to develop games or interactive content for clients, who are often primarily focused on the web, then mobile as a second platform.

Independent game development seems to focus primarily on desktop, then out to mobile and consoles from there, currently.

@meowman9000

I believe UDP should be possible?

https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&q=haxe+udp+sockets&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8


#5

Does anyone make games in HTML5 and sell licenses?


#6

I believe Spil Games does, Armor Games, and maybe others?


#7

Doesnt actually compile, just throws an unsupported message, Ive tested it.

If you look at the src:

public function new() {
	throw "Not available on this platform";
	super();
}

Not really sure why its still in the code base, should be removed so it doesnt waste peoples time.


#8

Seems to be available for C++ and Neko:


#9

Something to understand is that Haxe has multiple copies of many of its files. The one you found is mainly meant for code completion. When you use UdpSocket on C++ or Neko, Haxe uses a different version, designed specifically for that platform. (Joshua linked to the versions in question.)

Oddly, the documentation claims that the class is available on more platforms than those two, but I think this is a mistake, as there’s no implementation for any other target.

It’s there to provide default behavior, namely letting the programmer know that UdpSocket isn’t available.